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Talk by Jan Köpping, Thursday 14th, 4-6 pm (cancelled)

We are very happy to announce the next talk in the Semantics Colloquium, which will take place on Thursday, February 14, 4 – 6 pm in IG 4.301.

Jan Köpping (Goethe University) will present „What it takes to be unique“.

Abstract: Definite descriptions can be used in a multitude of ways: they can be used deictically and anaphorically, and they have de re as well as de dicto interpretations, etc. Some properties go hand in hand with several but not all of these uses, especially the infamous ‚uniqueness condition‘ that seems to be present in ‚presuppositional‘ but absent in anaphoric uses of the definite article. In this talk, I want to show what it needs to transform Irene Heim’s File Change Semantics — a system designed to account for anaphoric uses — into a framework that captures definite descriptions in such a way that uniqueness-effects only arise when they should without postulating an ambiguity of the definite article.

You are all cordially invited.

Talk by Jan Köpping, Thursday 14th, 4-6 pm (cancelled)

We are very happy to announce the next talk in the Semantics Colloquium, which will take place on Thursday, February 14, 4 – 6 pm in IG 4.301.

Jan Köpping (Goethe University) will present „What it takes to be unique“.

Abstract: Definite descriptions can be used in a multitude of ways: they can be used deictically and anaphorically, and they have de re as well as de dicto interpretations, etc. Some properties go hand in hand with several but not all of these uses, especially the infamous ‚uniqueness condition‘ that seems to be present in ‚presuppositional‘ but absent in anaphoric uses of the definite article. In this talk, I want to show what it needs to transform Irene Heim’s File Change Semantics — a system designed to account for anaphoric uses — into a framework that captures definite descriptions in such a way that uniqueness-effects only arise when they should without postulating an ambiguity of the definite article.

You are all cordially invited.

Talk by Prof. Firmin Ahoua (University Félix Houphouët-Boigny), Wednesday 13th, 4-6 pm

We are very happy to announce the next talk in the Phonology Colloquium, which will take place on Wednesday, February 13, 4 – 6 pm in IG 4.301.

Prof. Firmin Ahoua (University Félix Houphouët-Boigny) will present “ACO, The Secret language of the Cama people”.

Abstract:

Aco is a secret language spoken by the Ébrié (camancan) of Côte d’Ivoire that has never been documented, described or discovered by previous scholars who worked on the language and culture. This language is shared only by a closed circle of initiated speakers. The language is strongly ritualized and sacred and is performed with particular rhythms and songs during specific events. It is claimed to be used for incantations of protection against physical or spiritual enemies, songs for entertainment and also in traditional narratives. The initiated speakers are able to communicate on daily needs in this language as any regular native language. According to oral tradition, this language is assumed to have been created by a family in the village of Diapou in the South of Côte d’Ivoire about 100 years ago. The questions raised by the analysis of the data are : Is Aco an entirely new language by itself, or is it mixed or a pidgin or a creole type (cf. Crystal (2001)? What are its components or of which languages it is composed of? Is it entirely artificial or new? Is it a coded language like the French Verlan or an argot? How many Ebrie words are included in this artificially created language? Our hypothesis is that Aco is a new language with its own status. Our study relates to similar works achieved in West Africa by Mel (1981) on the Selu language, Dakubu (2013), Atchade (1991) and Affognon (1993) but shows that Aco is a more elaborated language, and not an argot as Krakagbe (cf. Atchade (1991) because of its large percentage of new foreign vocabulary. The data has been collected at the the Université Houphouet-Boigny and is composed of a lexion of Aco (ca. 600 words) and a collection of audio and video-recordings. The estimate of the degree of vitality is based on the experience with the local communities. The presents study is part of a project on creating a database and a documentation for an Atlas of the languages of Côte d’Ivoire under the supervision of Stavros, Gibbon, and myself in collaboration with the universities of Bielefeld, Frankfurt and Abidjan.

 

References:

Affognon A. Victor. 1993. Le krakagbe, l’argot des kraka du marché Dantokpa: étude sociolinguistique. Mémoire de maîtrise; sous la direction de Remy Bole-Richard. Université Nationale du Bénin.
Atchade Chambi Julien. 1991. Le saaram, langue ésotérique de Goro: Recherche d’identité. Mémoire de Maîtrise, sous la direction de Rémy Bole-Richard. Université Nationale du Benin.
Beck, Rose Marie. 2010. „Urban Languages in Africa.“ Africa Spectrum 3: 11-41.
Crystal, David. 2001. “The Cambridge encyclopedia of language.” Cambridge: CUP. 1987.10eGraff, Michel. “On the origin of creoles: A Cartesian critique of neo-Darwinian linguistics.” Linguistic Typology 5.
May, Stephen. 2012. Language and minority rights: Ethnicity, nationalism, and the politics of language. New York: Routledge.
Mary Esther Kropp Dakubu. 2013. Research on Vanishing Languages and Practices in the Northern Guang Area in Ghana: a preliminary report. Ghana Journal of Linguistics 2.1: 79-86

You are all cordially invited.

Talk by Prof. Firmin Ahoua (University Félix Houphouët-Boigny), Wednesday 13th, 4-6 pm

We are very happy to announce the next talk in the Phonology Colloquium, which will take place on Wednesday, February 13, 4 – 6 pm in IG 4.301.

Prof. Firmin Ahoua (University Félix Houphouët-Boigny) will present “ACO, The Secret language of the Cama people”.

Abstract:

Aco is a secret language spoken by the Ébrié (camancan) of Côte d’Ivoire that has never been documented, described or discovered by previous scholars who worked on the language and culture. This language is shared only by a closed circle of initiated speakers. The language is strongly ritualized and sacred and is performed with particular rhythms and songs during specific events. It is claimed to be used for incantations of protection against physical or spiritual enemies, songs for entertainment and also in traditional narratives. The initiated speakers are able to communicate on daily needs in this language as any regular native language. According to oral tradition, this language is assumed to have been created by a family in the village of Diapou in the South of Côte d’Ivoire about 100 years ago. The questions raised by the analysis of the data are : Is Aco an entirely new language by itself, or is it mixed or a pidgin or a creole type (cf. Crystal (2001)? What are its components or of which languages it is composed of? Is it entirely artificial or new? Is it a coded language like the French Verlan or an argot? How many Ebrie words are included in this artificially created language? Our hypothesis is that Aco is a new language with its own status. Our study relates to similar works achieved in West Africa by Mel (1981) on the Selu language, Dakubu (2013), Atchade (1991) and Affognon (1993) but shows that Aco is a more elaborated language, and not an argot as Krakagbe (cf. Atchade (1991) because of its large percentage of new foreign vocabulary. The data has been collected at the the Université Houphouet-Boigny and is composed of a lexion of Aco (ca. 600 words) and a collection of audio and video-recordings. The estimate of the degree of vitality is based on the experience with the local communities. The presents study is part of a project on creating a database and a documentation for an Atlas of the languages of Côte d’Ivoire under the supervision of Stavros, Gibbon, and myself in collaboration with the universities of Bielefeld, Frankfurt and Abidjan.

 

References:

Affognon A. Victor. 1993. Le krakagbe, l’argot des kraka du marché Dantokpa: étude sociolinguistique. Mémoire de maîtrise; sous la direction de Remy Bole-Richard. Université Nationale du Bénin.
Atchade Chambi Julien. 1991. Le saaram, langue ésotérique de Goro: Recherche d’identité. Mémoire de Maîtrise, sous la direction de Rémy Bole-Richard. Université Nationale du Benin.
Beck, Rose Marie. 2010. „Urban Languages in Africa.“ Africa Spectrum 3: 11-41.
Crystal, David. 2001. “The Cambridge encyclopedia of language.” Cambridge: CUP. 1987.10eGraff, Michel. “On the origin of creoles: A Cartesian critique of neo-Darwinian linguistics.” Linguistic Typology 5.
May, Stephen. 2012. Language and minority rights: Ethnicity, nationalism, and the politics of language. New York: Routledge.
Mary Esther Kropp Dakubu. 2013. Research on Vanishing Languages and Practices in the Northern Guang Area in Ghana: a preliminary report. Ghana Journal of Linguistics 2.1: 79-86

You are all cordially invited.

Talk by Emine Şahingöz, Tuesday 12th, 5-6 pm

We are very happy to announce the next talk in the GK Colloquium, which will take place on Tuesday, February 12, 5 – 6 pm in IG 3.104.

Emine Şahingöz (Goethe University) will present “Ossetic Phrasal Accent – A first Approach”.

Abstract:

In this talk I will first give a brief introduction to the accentuation rules of Ossetic (described below) and illustrate previous research on the Ossetic accent. Afterwards I will present my methodology and plans for upcoming fieldwork. 

The accentuation rules are relatively comprehensible: the stress in Ossetic (resp. the Iron dialect, as in Digor the rules differ), in separate words as well as in syntagmas (resp. phrases), depends on the distribution of strong (aeiou) and weak (æy) vowels; the first two vowels in a word or word group decide the stressed syllable. If the first vowel is a strong one, it is stressed. But if the first vowel is weak, usually the second syllable is stressed:

1) strong-strong 

2) strong-weak 

3) weak-strong 

4) weak-weak 

xábar (‘news’ sg.) 

bíræ (‘many’) 

xæʒár (‘house’) 

fyldǽr (‘more’) 

Affected syntagmas are connected and share a single stress, by which a considerable amount of words appear without an independent accent (Abaev 1949: 10 ff.). In the Iron dialect an accent retraction takes place whenever the noun is definite: ́ʒar ‘the house’ vs. xæʒár ‘(a) house’ (Cheung 2002: 118). According to Bailey (1945: 15 ff.), in historical stages of the language, definiteness used to be expressed by the particle *i (< *i̯a-), which is still preserved in the Digor dialect.

The Ossetic phrasal accent does not only affect the immediate constituents of the stressed word; it can affect a whole phrase:

(3)

Iron: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wyrýzmæg 

ys-xíz-y 

Sadénǯyzy 

 

kalač-y 

 

mæsyǯy 

 

sær-mæ 

PN 

pv-climb-3sg.prs 

black_sea-gen 

 

city-gen 

 

tower-gen 

 

head-dat 

In the colloquium, I will propose theories on how the Iron dialect shows the phenomenon of a phrasal accent, and how the Digor dialect does not have accentuation rules as clear as Iron.

References 

Abaev, V. I., 1949. Osetinskij jazyk i folklor. Moscow.

Bailey, H. W., 1945. Asica. Transactions of the Philological Society, 44 (1), 1-38.

Cheung, J., 2002. Studies in the historical development of the Ossetic vocalism (Vol. 21). Reichert Verlag.

 

You are all cordially invited.

Forschung

Das in Frankfurt am Fachbereich 10 (Neuere Philologien) angesiedelte Institut für Linguistik kann besondere Expertise in den Bereichen Sprachstruktur (Syntax und Phonologie), Bedeutung (Semantik und Pragmatik), Psycholinguistik (Spracherwerb, Sprachverarbeitung) und historische Linguistik vorweisen – diese Bereiche werden von international bekannten Forscherpersönlichkeiten vertreten. Darüber hinaus bestehen enge Kontakte und über einzelne Projekte hinausgehende Kooperationen mit den Sprachwissenschaftlern in den Einzelphilologien am Fachbereich (Anglistik und Romanistik), mit der Philosophie (Fachbereich 8), und dem Institut für empirische Sprachwissenschaft am Fachbereich 9 (Sprach- und Kulturwissenschaften).

Neben dem Institut für Linguistik wird Linguistik in Forschung und Lehre auch in anderen Instituten betrieben. Details dazu finden Sie hier:

Das Potenzial der Frankfurter Linguistik liegt vor allem im Bereich der linguistischen Grundlagenforschung. Die rege Forschungstätigkeit wird in diversen Projekten gebündelt.

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Am Institut für Linguistik finden sich die folgenden Professuren:

Hier kommen Sie zur Seite der Geschäftsführung.

Das in Frankfurt am Fachbereich 10 (Neuere Philologien) angesiedelte Institut für Linguistik kann besondere Expertise in den Bereichen Sprachstruktur (Syntax und Phonologie), Bedeutung (Semantik und Pragmatik), Psycholinguistik (Spracherwerb, Sprachverarbeitung) und historische Linguistik vorweisen – diese Bereiche werden von international bekannten Forscherpersönlichkeiten vertreten.

Darüber hinaus bestehen enge Kontakte und über einzelne Projekte hinausgehende Kooperationen mit den Sprachwissenschaftlern in den Einzelphilologien am Fachbereich (Anglistik und Romanistik), mit der Philosophie (Fachbereich 8), und dem Institut für empirische Sprachwissenschaft am Fachbereich 9 (Sprach- und Kulturwissenschaften).

Das Potenzial der Frankfurter Linguistik liegt vor allem im Bereich der linguistischen Grundlagenforschung. Die rege Forschungstätigkeit wird unter anderem in der DFG-Forschergruppe Relativsätze gebündelt.

Das Institut für Linguistik betreut die Studiengänge BA- und MA-Linguistik, und ist für die linguistische Ausbildung im BA-Germanistik und in den Lehramtsstudiengängen (Fach Deutsch) zuständig.