Propositionalism in Linguistic Semantics

This article, that was recently published in the journal EU Research (SUM19/P66), vividly explains the research field of Prof. Dr. Zimmerman's projekt "Propositionalism in Linguistic Semantics". https://issuu.com/euresearcher/docs/propositionalism_in_linguistic_semantics_eur20_h_r Find the entire magazine here....
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Talk by Beata Moskal, Yranahan Traore and Caroline Fery, Wednesday 17th, 4-6 pm

We are very happy to announce the last talk in the Phonology Colloquium, which will take place on Wednesday, July 17, 4 – 6 pm in IG 4.301. Beata Moskal, Yranahan Traore and Caroline Fery will present „Nominalisation in Tagbana“. Abstract: Nominalisation in Tagbana uses the same class markers as used to form regular nouns, but the form of the nominaliser CMs is less allomorphic. It will be demonstrated that Distributed Morphology accounts for this fact in a straightforward way. You are cordially invited! ...
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Talk by Kai Wehmeier (UCI), Wednesday 17th, 2-4 pm

We are very happy to announce a guest talk, which will take place on Wednesday, July 17, 2 – 4 pm in IG 4.301. Kai Wehmeier (UCI) will present „On Boxes and Quantifiers“. Abstract: Whether operations such as necessitation or universal quantification create extensional or intensional contexts depends on what counts as an extension. In "Pragmatics and Intensional Logic" (1970), Montague proposes an asymmetric approach that makes the box an intensional but the standard first-order quantifier an extensional context. In this talk, I will investigate whether there are any formal grounds for such differential treatment of boxes and quantifiers. To this end, I develop some general theory of notational variance between interpreted formal languages. I show that extant results do indeed point to a lack of complete correspondence between modal operator and ordinary first-order languages. Nevertheless, a single notational innovation reveals that modal languages really are notational variants of (compositional fragments of) certain first-order languages in a very strict sense. I conclude that...
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